Language Engagement Project - Mini Courses

           Language Engagement Project (LEP) mini-courses (under subject code 991) are interdisciplinary 1-credit courses on world languages and cultures hosted by the Language Center at Rutgers. There are three types of LEP courses: (a) mini-courses (stand-alone courses), (b) modules (must be taken with a concurrent course), and (c) activities (format departs from traditional classroom instruction). Courses taught in a language other than English will typically have a language requirement. Below are LEP courses taught or advised by ALC faculty members that complement our 3 and 4 credit course offerings.

For questions regarding LEP courses offered by ALC, contact Yuan-Chen Jenny Yang (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

To learn more about LEP mini-courses, visit Language Engagement Project.

 

01:991:105 : Languages and Cultures across the Curriculum: Tadoku: Extensive Reading in Japanese 

Description: 

This course is designed for students who have registered for Elementary Japanese II, Intermediate Japanese I /II, or Advanced Japanese I / II. This course aims to improve students' comprehension skills and reading fluency in modern Japanese texts, as well as promote pleasure reading in foreign language through Tadoku (extensive reading method). In class, students will choose reading materials from their own reading level and spend the majority of class time for sustained silent reading. Instructor monitors student’s reading behavior and gives advice and suggestions to improve their reading skills.  

  Students will also engage in a variety of activities such as small group discussion, journal writing, shadowing, and presentations, and through these activities, will cultivate three other language skills that are equally essential for language acquisition . By the end of the course, students will develop skills to predict and learn new lexical items and grammatical structures, as well as kanji reading skills. 

Concurrent courses (for modules only): Must also register for or have previously taken one of the courses below:

01:565:102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401

Language requirement (if taught in language other than English): Completed 01:165:101 (or placed at an equal level by Japanese placement test), or by permission of the instructor 

 Registration is by Special Permission. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register.

 

01:991:105  Languages and Cultures across the Curriculum: Samurai Tradition in Japanese

Description: 

This module is attached to 565:320 "The Samurai Tradition in Japanese Literature and Film." The course will explore representations of samurai in Japanese culture, past and present, and the ongoing meaning of the samurai tradition in contemporary Japanese culture. Students will examine and analyze modern translations of classical texts, short stories, prints, manga, films, documentaries, and TV shows in Japanese, through which they also learn terms and expressions specific to the samurai tradition. The class will also involve lessons, discussions, and oral presentations in Japanese and seeks to cultivate a better understanding of grammar, expressions and communicative skills. 

Concurrent courses (for modules only): Must also register for or have previously taken 01:565:320

Language requirement (if taught in language other than English): Completed or currently enrolled in 01:565:202 (or placed at an equal level by Japanese placement test) or by permission of the instructor

 Registration is by Special Permission. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register. 

 

01:991:121 Languages and Cultures across the Curriculum: Modern Chinese Societies: Key Words in the Media

Description: 

Any idea can be expressed in any language, but concepts central to a culture tend to be lexicalized or become set phrases. Through the lens of key words and phrases in the media, this module explores how current events in Chinese societies are reported in Chinese and western media, and in turn, how these words and phrases impact the readers and viewers’ perception of the events. The module covers five topics on recent or ongoing events and focuses on two key words/phrases for each topic. The module is conducted in Chinese and English. Readings, multimedia viewings and assignments are also in both languages.

Concurrent courses (for modules only): Must also register for or have previously taken one of the courses below: 01:165:211 Language and Identity in Modern Chinese Societies, or 01:165:301, 302, 361, 362, 401, 402. 

Language requirement:

Must have completed 01:165:202 or 01:165:222, or placed into FCA or higher in the Chinese placement test, or by permission of the instructor.

 Registration is by Special Permission. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register.

 

01:991:170 Language Activities in Service: World Languages Story Time—Chinese 

Description: 

Students will become familiar with the basics of storytelling and song singing techniques to preschoolers and elementary students. They practice these techniques in their preparation and delivery of Chinese stories and songs at a local public venue (e.g. local library). Students are expected to prepare and deliver stories and/or songs for at least two on-site sessions, and make a 5-minute storytelling video for the final project. Students will understand the cognitive, linguistic and social development of children in the target audience through the guest lecture on early childhood education. They will gain insight into the Chinese storytelling tradition and compare it with other cultures through the field trip to the Princeton University Cotsen Children’s Library. In addition, students will be able to share their passion for learning Chinese with young children and their parents in the community, and encourage them to embrace their heritage language or learn Chinese as a foreign language.

Language requirement:

Must have completed 01:165:102 or 01:165:121, or placed into 201 or higher in the Chinese placement test, or by permission of the instructor.

 

01:991:111 EAST ASIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO WORLD CUISINE 1 credit Course

Description: 

This course will explore the social, economic, and political dimensions of modern East Asian culture’s contribution to world cuisine. Examining how China, Japan, and Korea’s culinary heritage influence inter-regional and international relations, students will become versed in how social identities and hierarchies are produced through the production, preparation, and consumption of food.                Topics will include

  •  understanding cultural significance, historical background, and global circulation of East Asian culinary culture,
  •  introduction to cross-cultural food practices within the political context of colonialism, cold war, and transnationalism
  •  critical engagement of the homogenizing effects of globalization and diversification through globalization, and
  •  the role of East Asian foods in regional and global economies.

Students will also learn about the language of food, in particular, East Asia’s global linguistic and cultural impact on how we understand and share agricultural Ingredients, food, taste, and cooking practices. Taught in English.

 

01:991:210 EXPLORATIONS IN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES COURSE 2 EXPLORING SEOUL THROUGH FILMS (1 CR)

Description:

Exploring Seoul Through Films is a course intended for advanced students who wish to improve their language skills and intercultural competence. 

Students will watch five films set in the capital city of South Korea in order to understand five characteristics of urban scenes:

  •  the importance of the Han River,
  •  the role of back alleys in residential neighborhoods,
  •  the apartment republic a la Gangnam style,
  •  comparison of Seoul with Pyongyang of North Korea, and
  •  the rise of the new urban consciousness.

Each film viewing will be accompanied by reading short texts to enhance sociocultural understanding. This course also enables students to understand Korean culture and history and to develop cross-cultural insights by comparing Korean society with US society. Korean history, image of Korea, and current social trends in Korea will be discussed for a solid understanding of Korean culture in which Korean language is embedded. Course materials and tasks are designed to improve language proficiency with a focus on vocabulary, cohesion and organization. Taught in Korean.

 

Language Exchange and Language Mentoring 1 credit courses

 

01:991:150:01 ACTIVITIES IN LANGUAGES & CULTURES: MENTORING 

Description: 

    This activity includes the following, Via the practice of language mentoring, improve language proficiency according to individual placement-level criteria, learn about 2nd-language acquisition/learning processes and outcomes, and/or study the cultural dimensions or relevance of language(s).                                                                                   

Special notation: 

Placement test may be required as part of activity eligibility. Performed in English or another language, as specified for the particular activity. Offered Every Semester.

 

01:991:160:01 ACTIVITIES IN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES: EXCHANGES 

Description: 

  This activity allows partnerships of two students to exchange conversation in two different languages they wish to share and learn. Students are partnered up to exchange conversation in both languages with one of their peers once a week for an hour at a regular time period that fits their schedule. Language Exchange partners meet a few times with a faculty member from one of the language departments of SAS who validates the Exchange. They keep short journal entries noting the linguistic skills practiced and the cultural elements and topics discussed. For the end of the semester, they produce a five minute video presenting their exchange and highlighting all the fun they've had. All student-partners who complete all LEA-Exchange assignments together will be validated by their faculty supervisor to receive 1 credit and a P grade at the end of the term. No incomplete exchange will be validated for credit, regardless of the reason why the exchange could not be completed.

Special notation: 

Placement test may be required as part of activity eligibility.